What Does Biblical Inclusion of LGBTQ People Look Like? 

Preston Sprinkle

What does healthy, gospel-centered, biblical inclusion look like? If someone experiences same-sex attraction or distress over their biological sex, how should Christian churches welcome them? Care for them? Be cared for by them? (Maybe we should start by not saying “them?”) 

I’m sure you have an opinion about all this—I do too. And I’m confident you have some questions—I have some too. That’s why I’m excited to devote an entire three-hour session to these questions at this year’s Exiles in Babylon conference.

During our session on LBGTQ People and the Church, we’ll hear from four different voices, all of whom experience same-sex attraction and/or gender dysphoria. All four hold to a historic Christian view of sexual ethics and marriage. 

Greg Coles, Brenna Blain, Art Pereira, and Kat LaPrairie will help us understand what it’s like to experience the evangelical church as someone who loves Jesus, loves the Bible, and experiences same-sex attraction or gender dysphoria. As always, you’ll be able to ask questions! 

The Exiles conference resists monologues and welcomes dialogue. This session will be no different, as we wrestle with a wide range of issues: 

Can singles flourish in the church? In your church? Or is there an unstated expectation that every Christian will get married (to the opposite sex) and live happily ever after? Are there any unstated limits on how Christians who are gay can serve, even if they 100% endorse the church’s stance on marriage and sexuality? What are some dehumanizing things the church does and says that unintentionally turn gender dysphoric and trans people away from the gospel? How can the church be radically welcoming to all people, and also radically committed to the truth of Scripture? 

Come wrestle with us at Exiles24! Boise, ID. April 18-20, 2024. Registration is filling up, so sign up soon! 

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